Final Garments…

What?!! Two posts in one day?! That’s right, your eyes aren’t deceiving you. No outfit post, will try and do one later but need to write a journal entry on the construction of my final garments, which apart from sewing some press studs into the ruffle skirted women’s dress are finished!!! I feel like such a huge weight has been lifted, I still have things to do such as putting together a book of all my samples but I feel like I should get everything done  in the time I have left (7 days eeeeeeekks!!)

So there are images of the children’s dresses in my previous posts but I wanted to show some close up shots so that I could talk about the construction in a bit more detail:

The wing sleeved dress:

I’ve written a lot about the construction of this dress already but just a few overall reflections; this dress has been the most expensive to produce, even more than any of the womenswear. This is primarily because of my fabric choices; the main dress is sand-washed silk, the sleeves and collar silk georgette and the lining is silk twill. The sleeves have also been a major expense, when the fabric is pleated you have to allow 3 times as much as you would normally require; this meant that for the sleeves on a dress for 7 year old I required 3metres of fabric! The pleated fabric has also been quite difficult to work with, I think that if you were to use it on a more commercial scale then it would be for simpler garments such as a skirt or for finishing touches such as the collar. Hemming this fabric also proved problematic, I decided that the best way was to keep the edges raw and seal them with fray stop; this has kept the fragile and delicate feel that I was aiming for. The sand-washed silk I’ve used for the main dress is beautiful, it’s very tactile and has enough weight to it that it hangs really beautifully without being too heavy. It creases very easily though and the creases are difficult to press out, especially as I don’t want to risk getting steam any where near the pleated fabric.

The Dragonfly Box-Pleated Dress:

This dress is made in age 2 and looks so cute! I’m really pleased with this, I fitted the toile to the model and then spent about 5 hours on Saturday hand painting the dragonfly wing pattern onto the dress. I then stitched the box pleats into place and the way they break up the print design is more effective than I had ever imagined. I really love this one, which is funny because it was originally the one that was my least favourite! I’m actually looking into the possibility of putting this into production at the moment, obviously this would mean getting the wing design made into a screen. I have put a facing in this dress that finishes just under the arms, I was finding it particularly difficult around the armholes as I wanted the finish to be as professional as possible. This tutorial I found on Fashion Incubator was really useful though and I’m very proud of the end result. Here’s a close up of the pleated and printed fabric, you can see how the lines of the print are broken up by the pleating:

 I didn’t want to machine stitch the hem as I didn’t want a line of  stitching interfering with the bottom of the box pleats, for this reason I pressed the hem under and then caught it to the dress with a slip-stitch.

The Dandelion Pin-tucked Dress:

I don’t think I actually had any problems putting this dress together! The pintucks look beautiful and match up perfectly on the front and back at the shoulder seams:

I had originally intended just to have the dandelion painted in gold but it just didn’t stand out enough and so I’ve added some fine detail with the brown I used on the dragonfly dresses. I also drew the design on with a disappearing fabric pen so that I didn’t risk messing the design up. Again, I am really pleased with the end result of this dress and would consider putting this into production: perhaps with fewer pintucks though as there is 36 altogether on the front and back!!

I will write a post about the womenswear dresses tomorrow once I have taken some photos of them on a mannequin.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: